Credit Courses

2015-2016 Catalog (Courses updated for 2016-2017)

Credit Courses





BBG* E240 Business Ethics

A study of business from a personal and social perspective. The course concentrates on assessing how business affects our individual lives, and what role business and its values play in our society as a whole. Ethical issues in business theory and practice will be analyzed including such topics as morality, quality of life, codes of ethics, obligations to stakeholders, rewards and responsibilities, whistle-blowing, company loyalty, attitudes toward work, the values of capitalism, and attitudes toward people living and working around us in society.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BBG* E270 Import/Export Procedures

Import/Export: How to Take Your Business Across Borders - this course will be for managers of firms, students, and entrepreneurs who see opportunity in the expanding global marketplace. Therefore, international trade cannot be a static process, and businesses that make products and attempt to sell them across borders must constantly adjust. It provides the transaction mechanism of importing and exporting and helps learners gain an appreciation of the total process and how it fits into import/export regulations and documentation.

Prerequisites: ENG* E101 & BBG* E215 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3

BBG* E281 Writing and Research in Business and Industry

This course emphasizes the aspects of research gathering, structured writing, and organizing written reports and oral presentations applicable to business and industry. Students will demonstrate the processes and procedures required for the business technical writing in the fields of science, technology, and business.

Prerequisites: BBG* E101 and ENG* E101, each with a grade of "C" or higher
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BBG* E295 CO-OP Work Experience I

Consists of paid employment with a cooperating business concern previously approved of by the College. Employment will be limited to a minimum of fifteen hours and a maximum of twenty hours per week. The student's employment will be in the area of his/her business major.

Note: Students intending to register for this course must have the prior approval of the Chairperson of the Business Department.

  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BBG* E299 Independent Study in Business

Students will have an opportunity to pursue with greater depth a subject area of particular individual interest. All independent projects must be arranged in the semester prior to registration with advanced departmental approval and with the supervision of one of the full-time Business faculty.

  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BES* E118 Small Business Management

A general survey of operating a small business including: choosing a business structure; location; marketing and target audience; pricing strategies; capital financing; management; and cash flow analysis. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding of a Business Plan. Business Department majors CANNOT use either BBG* E101 or BES*E118 as a business elective in order to satisfy graduation requirements. A computer lab account or personal computer with Internet access will be required.

  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BES* E218 Entrepreneurship

An exploration of the entrepreneurial and franchising process, addressing the skills, concepts, mental attitudes, and knowledge relevant for creating, building, and operating new business ventures. Attention will be given to examining new venture opportunities, strategies, entrepreneurial profiles, resource recognition, allocation and development, capital acquisition, and post start-up strategies. Major emphasis will be placed on creative development of individual business plans incorporating computer applications.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 and BES* E118 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BES* E295 Launch a Business

This course is designed for students who are contemplating or ready to launch a business, have an established business, or are working in a family-owned business. The student will learn to execute pre-launch plans and build a MVP (Minimum Viable Product or Service), prepare and conduct a marketing campaign, file legal documents, obtain start-up funding, select a location, calculate a break-even analysis, deliver a pitch to judges, and operate the business to discover a sustainable business model. The experiential learning approach will be used in this course allowing students to learn essential entrepreneurial skill- sets to create and operate a small business. Students will be mentored by the instructor and other outside business experts. This course is eight weeks: Classroom, Online, and Offsite Weekend attendance mandatory NOTE: This course requires participation in two Saturday off-campus sessions with students from the other participating schools, and “Launch Weekend” a total emersion entrepreneurship event at local hotel. A room will be reserved for you for Saturday evening as part of the “Course Materials Package” that also includes an interactive electronic text and workbook, office supplies during the joint session and meals during “Launch Weekend”. Register and download the Course Materials at www.newventurechallenge.org

BES* E118 or Permission of Instructor.
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: BUS

BFN* E110 Personal Finance

This course assists students in gaining the knowledge, tools, attitude, and skills needed to make informed lifelong financial decisions that will empower their lives. Students explore the social, psychological, and physiological issues related to planning and managing a personal financial plan. Topics include goal setting, budgeting, money management, taxes, savings, consumer credit, automobiles, housing, insurance, investment vehicles, retirement and estate planning and the financial impact of marriage and divorce.

  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BFN* E125 Principles of Banking

An overview of the banking industry. Topics include the language and documents of banking, check processing, teller functions, deposit functions and the role of the bank in the community.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BFN* E201 Principles of Finance

A study of the fundamental principles and concepts of finance. Topics include the basic concepts of financial statement analysis, time value of money, risk and return, valuation of corporate bonds and common stock, cost of capital, capital budgeting, short-term financing, cash budgeting and a brief introduction to financial markets. Substantial lab time will be required in the computer lab. The textbook and an on-line supplemental access code (bundle) are required.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 and ACC* E113 with a grade of "C" or higher, or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BFN* E203 Investment Principles (Spring only)

A study of the fundamental principles and concepts of analysis and an evaluation of a variety of financial investments with emphasis on common stocks and bonds. The working of capital markets and the determination of interest rates will also be covered. Substantial lab time will be required in the computer lab. The textbook and an on-line supplemental access code (bundle) are required.

Prerequisite: BFN* E201 with a grade of "C" or higher or permission of instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BFN* E211 Money & Banking (Fall only)

A study of the key concepts, theories and interrelationships that link money and banking to the U.S. economy. The topics covered will include the principles of money and credit, basic banking regulations, determination of interest rates and foreign exchange rates, monetary policy, and the mission and tools of the Federal Reserve System. The structure and characteristics of financial markets are also covered. Substantial lab time will be required in the computer lab. The textbook and an on-line supplemental access code (bundle) are required.

Prerequisite: BFN* E201 or ECN* E101, either course with a grade of "C" or higher; or permission of instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BFN* E235 International Finance

The international dimensions of finance. Topics include the international monetary system, foreign exchange markets, management of foreign exchange exposure and political risk, the financing of international trade, international financial markets, and capital budgeting techniques. This course builds upon the valuation methods developed in the prerequisite course in Finance.

Prerequisite or Parallel: BFN* E201
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BIO* E105 Introduction to Biology

A study of the characteristics of life, the processes living organisms use to sustain life and the way in which they pass information to future generations. The adaptations of humans are explored and compared with those of other organisms. Classification is presented to gain an appreciation of the unity and diversity of life.

3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

Prerequisite: Eligible for ENG* E101 or ENG* E101IW
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E111 Introduction to Nutrition

An introduction to the principles of human nutrition. The six essential nutrients are discussed in relationship to energy, growth and metabolism. Investigation of the scientific research on foods and their effect on health, disease and weight management. Students will perform a computerized analysis of their diet and make dietary modifications based on their findings.

  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E117 Biological Basis of Health and Disease

A survey of the biochemical, cellular and systemic abnormalities that result in diseases of man. The normal and abnormal structure, function and interrelationship between the various organ systems will be explored via extensive use of case studies and independent research.

Prerequisite: BIO*105 or BIO*121
Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG* E101
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E121 General Biology I

An introduction to the principles and processes of living organisms. The course is designed to serve as the basis for further study in biology: it explores the chemical basis of life, including molecular biology, respiration and photosynthesis; the structure and function of the cell; the genetic basis of inheritance; and the evolution of life. Similarities and differences among organisms are also discussed. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours Laboratory.

3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG* E101
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E122 General Biology II

An introduction to the principles and processes operating in living organisms. This course is designed to serve as the basis for further study in biology. This section of the two-semester sequence explores the anatomy and physiology of: bacteria, archaea, plants, fungi and animals. Interactions between organisms and their environment will be discussed. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

Prerequisite: BIO*E121 or BIO*E105
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E175 Introduction to Marine Science

This course is an introduction to marine science. Topics to be explored include general marine biology, intertidal ecology, plankton biology, marine communities and the geomorphology of the New England coast. Some field work will be included.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E208 Forensic Science with Laboratory

An introduction to the principles of forensic science with an emphasis on logical and scientific thinking as it applies to biological and chemical physical evidence. The laboratory portion of this course develops knowledge and skills in laboratory safety, investigative techniques and the use of scientific methodologies including observation and measurement. Topics include: the analysis of DNA, fingerprints, hair and fiber, soil, bone; microscopy; chromatography; and toxicology. Students will develop proper techniques and procedures for maintaining crime scene integrity and evidence in the laboratory. 

This course is equivalent to CJS* E285 & SCI* E285. Students can only receive credit for either BIO*E208, SCI* E285, CJS* E285. 4 credits. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

Prerequisite: CJS* E101 (CJ majors only), BIO* E105 or BIO* E121 and Eligible for ENG* E101 or ENG* E101W
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E211 Anatomy & Physiology I

The first semester of a two semester course. Lecture and laboratory will stress the molecular and cellular theories of body homeostasis. Topics include the structure of cells and tissues and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, special senses, and nervous systems, with an underlying stress on their chemical functioning. Lab deals with chemical analysis, histology, bone and muscle identification, articulations, special senses, and nervous system anatomy.

3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

Prerequisites: ENG* E101, BIO* E105 with a grade of C or higher. Recommended: CHE* E111
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E212 Anatomy & Physiology II

A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology II. Lecture and laboratory will stress the structure and functional aspects of the endocrine, blood, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Metabolism, fluid and electrolyte balance, and development and inheritance are also included. Lab deals with histological and detailed anatomical evaluation of body systems indicated above.

3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 with a grade of "C" or higher and BIO* E211
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E235 Microbiology

The history of microbiology and a survey of microbial life. The bacteria are studied as characteristic prototypes of all microorganisms. These and other microorganisms are discussed, stressing their environment, growth, reproduction, metabolism, and relationship to humans.

3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

ENG* E101, CHE* E111 or CHE* E121, and BIO* E105 or BIO* E121, each with a grade of "C" or higher.
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E260 Principles of Genetics

An introductory course in genetics. Covers the basic principles of genetics from Mendel to recombinant DNA, with focus on human inheritance. Topics of emphasis include cancer, diseases with a genetic component, functional genomics, and modern methods of molecular genetics. 3 hours lecture per week.

Prerequisite: BIO* E121 or equivalent
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E290 Research Methods for Health Sciences

An introduction to both qualitative and quantitative research methodology. A variety of processes, evaluation techniques and data resources are used to examine the purpose of research, identify and critique scholarly writing, and apply critical thinking and research findings to the health science field. 3 hours lecture per week.

Prerequisite: MAT* E167 or equivalent
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: S

BIO* E299 Independent Study in Biology

This course is an individualized project allowing the student to independently study an area of interest in Biology under the supervision of a full-time Biology faculty member. Description of the project must be approved by the Math/Science Department, the instructor, and the Academic Dean the semester before taking the course.

Permission of Instructor
  • Credits: 1-3
  • Elective Code: S

BMG* E202 Principles of Management

An introductory course in management concepts, principles, theories, and practices. Management is viewed as a discipline and as a process. The scope of the course includes ethics, decision-making, communication, planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Basic management concepts will be applied in solving problems in organizations. Self-assessment and management principles are also explored. Substantial lab time will be required in the computer lab.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BMG* E203 Leadership

An in-depth examination of the nature and importance of leadership concepts and principles as applied to organizational effectiveness. Competent leadership is required to meet organizational challenges in a rapidly changing, globally competitive world. Leadership research findings, practice, and skills are emphasized in light of modern theories and applications. Cases and skill development exercises will be used extensively.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BMG* E210 Organizational Behavior

The study of people and groups in organizations. Includes the study of team effectiveness, learning styles, communications, motivation, conflict, the evaluation of behavior. Extensive student participation. Orientation is toward development of personal effectiveness in dealing with others.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of instructor
  • Credits: 3

BMG* E220 Human Resources Management

An objective analysis of functions involved in the administration of human relations in organizations. Topics include principles of organization, processes, systems and methods used in the selection, training and recruitment of the work force; motivation and communications; compensation and fringe benefits and approaches used in maintaining good industrial relations.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BMG* E226 Negotiation

An in-depth examination of the nature and importance of negotiation concepts and principles as applied to organizational effectiveness. Competent negotiation skills are required to meet organizational challenges in a rapidly changing, globally competitive world. Negotiation fundamentals, sub-processes, contexts, and remedies are emphasized in light of modern theories and applications. Cases and skill development exercises will be used extensively.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BMK* E103 Principles of Retailing

A review of retailing practices and procedures. Retail management methods are studied, along with retail store location and layout, equipment, display, advertising, personnel policies, maintenance, inventory, and cost control.

Prerequisite: ENG* E043 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BMK* E106 Principles of Selling

An examination of various philosophies of selling. Topics include communication and persuasion, selling strategies and techniques, self-management skills, planning, behavioral styles, and market-client analysis. Students develop and role-play sales presentations as a major part of the course work.

  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BMK* E123 Principles of Customer Service

An in-depth examination of the role of customer service in creating and recreating satisfied customers. Concepts and principles are examined as applied to organizational challenges encountered in a rapidly changing, globally competitive world. Topics covered include strategy, communications, challenging customers, leadership, customer retention and excellence in customer service. Practical applications and skills are emphasized in light of modern theories and applications. Cases and skill development exercises will be used.

Prerequisite: ENG* E043 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BMK* E201 Principles of Marketing

A study of the scope and significance of marketing in contemporary American business with emphasis on marketing consumer goods and developing the essential elements of the marketing mix (product, price, distribution, and promotion). Substantial lab time will be required in the computer lab.

Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG* E043 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BMK* E205 Business to Business Marketing

Exploration of marketing concepts as they relate to the field of business to business marketing. Major topics include business marketing environmental analysis, the organizational buying process, assessing business marketing opportunities, formulation of business marketing strategies, business marketing mix development, implementation, and evaluation. Student teams develop and present a business to business marketing plan.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BMK* E207 Consumer Behavior

An examination of consumer behavior as a function of the overall marketing plan. Concepts from the social and behavioral sciences are applied to describing and understanding consumer decision processes. Topics include psychological core foundations, decision making processes, consumer's culture, and consumer behavior outcomes.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BMK* E212 Sports Marketing

This course examines sports media and marketing from both theoretical and practical perspectives. The course explores the role of media in contemporary sports, and media?s influence on participants, competitors, fans, and the wide range of sports institutions and enterprises. The course also addresses traditional and new media, public relations, direct and viral marketing, and more, as elements of promotion along with the other components of the sports marketing mix: product development and management, pricing, and distribution of sports offerings. Marketing planning, plan implementation and evaluation are incorporated into the course. Unique challenges and opportunities in sports marketing will be discussed. Projects and assignments focus on sports programs, ranging from recreational to professional teams, and from non-profit sports organizations to commercial sports enterprises locally and nationally.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3

BMK* E214 International Marketing

Exploration of marketing concepts as they relate to the field of international marketing. Major topics include international environmental analysis (culture, law, governments), formulation of international marketing strategies, marketing mix development and implementation. Student teams develop and present an international marketing plan.

Prerequisite: BMK* E201
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BMK* E216 Internet Marketing

This course introduces the student to the world of e-marketing, including websites, blogs, newsletters, email and more. Using a combination of structured course content, in-class web experiences and outside exercises, the class will focus on adopting and optimizing internet marketing tools. Drawing from business research and best-in-class examples of successful e-marketing, the course will give students a practical perspective on how institutions and businesses can take advantage of e-marketing, as well as the real, results-driven aspects of e-business. A goal of the course is to keep pace with the latest strategies and developments in this field.

Prerequisite: ENG* E043
  • Credits: 3

BMK* E241 Principles of Advertising

An exploration of the principles and applications of advertising. Topics include advertising, research, planning, ad creation, media planning and campaign implementation. Student teams conceive, produce and integrate all the components necessary for an advertising campaign as a major part of the coursework.

Prerequisite: ENG* E043 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BOT* E111 Keyboarding for Information Processing I

A beginning course in touch keyboarding, emphasizing mastery of the keyboard, and correct alphabetic, numeric, and numeric keypad fingering techniques; centering, memorandums, personal business letters, business letters, tabulations, business reports, and manuscripts. This course is open to all students and is designed for both personal use as well as the first course for the BOT student. Un-arranged problem applications and production-timed activities receive major emphasis. This is a touch-typing course at the beginning level of skill designed to familiarize the student with the keyboard and correct keyboarding techniques. Substantial lab time will be required in the computer lab.

This course meets the Computer Fundamentals Requirement

Prerequisite: ENG* E043
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B, C

BOT* E112 Keyboarding for Information Processing II

Continued emphasis on keyboarding skills with drills for improvement in technique, speed, and accuracy. Increased emphasis is given on more difficult letters, manuscripts and reports, tables, and legal and medical documents. Unarranged problem applications and production-timed activities receive major emphasis. Open to BOT students. Substantial lab time is required in the computer lab.

Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG* E101, Prerequisite: BOT* E111 with a grade of "C" or higher
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BOT* E137 Word Processing Applications

An introduction to computer literacy, computer applications, concepts, and operations. A software package provides hands-on experience in various models of letters, reports, special forms, and rough drafts. The student will be able to create, edit, manipulate, and print documents leading to entry-level skills in Windows-based computer software package. Substantial laboratory time is required in the computer lab.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 and a grade of "C" or higher in BOT* E111 or permission of the Instructor
Parallel: BOT* E112
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B, C

BOT* E215 Word Processing Applications II

A course designed to equip students with the problem-solving and decision-making skills necessary to operate a word processing system. This course covers more complex operations performed on a word processor. Concepts will be stressed. Familiarity with the technical and functional operations of the word processor and several specialized types of operations such as merge, graphics, and proofreading and communications as they relate to the efficient operation of a word-processing system will be essential. Pagination will be utilized. Substantial laboratory time is required each week.

Prerequisite: ENG*E101 and BOT*E112 and BOT*E137 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B, C

BOT* E216 Spreadsheet Applications

Provides students with the hands-on experience necessary to create, print, modify, and enhance electronic spreadsheets. This course also covers creating and printing charts; using formulas with absolute addresses and function formulas; Goal Seek; Solver, using and filtering Data Lists; creating Pivot Charts, using Outlines, Subtotals, and Lookup functions, and preparing what-if alternatives. Substantial lab time is requred in the computer lab.

Prerequisite: CSA* E106 or BOT* E210 or permission of the instructor. Basic computer touch-typing skills required
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BOT* E217 Desktop Publishing

A course designed for students who desire some familiarity with desktop publishing processes through a hands-on approach. Students will be introduced to a desktop publishing software package such as PageMaker or others used in producing newsletters, reports, graphics, style sheets and master pages, special effects and scanned images. Substantial laboratory time is required each week.

*Non-degree/non-matriculating students require permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite: BOT* E112 and BOT* E137 or BOT* E215 or permission of the instructor*
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BOT* E218 Database Management

Provides students with hands-on experience entering and editing data, working with and customizing forms, creating and using queries, creating and customizing printing reports and mailing labels, and creating and relating tables using database software. Substantial lab time will be required in the computer lab.

Prerequisite: CSA* E106 or BOT* E210 or permission of the instructor. Basic computer touch-typing skills required
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BOT* E251 Administrative Procedures

An investigation into office automation designed to give a perspective to the role of the college-trained administrative assistant. Development of office skills and problem-solving techniques are explored. Included are human relations skills, time-management techniques, interpersonal communications skills, timings, resumes, cover letters, and listening skills as well as decision-making competencies. Techniques used in applying for a job and a review of the employment process utilize role-model processes. Other models may be included as technology changes. Substantial laboratory time is required each week.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 and BOT* E112 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

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