Credit Courses

2015-2016 Catalog (Courses updated for 2016-2017)

Credit Courses





BOT* E260 Administrative Management

An introductory course that will address the broad areas of administrative office management. It is designed to assist the student in forming a basic philosophy of the administrative office manager and to assist in developing skills in managerial decision making, and to create a desire to choose administrative office management as a career.

Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG* E101
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

BRE* E101 Introduction to Property Management of Supportive and Affordable Housing

This survey course is the first of the required courses in the Property Management Certificate Program. It provides an overview of the different types of multi-family affordable and supportive housing, including housing linked with social services. This course profiles the different populations living in affordable and supportive house and describes the role of supportive service personnel in aiding at-risk tenants. This course explores the different housing programs that pay for construction, rehabilitation and operating subsidies at the federal, state, and local levels. It covers applicable legal concerns such as the Fair Housing Law. While property managers must obey laws regarding their fiduciary obligations to their clients and customers, ethical standards often go beyond the letter of the law and reflect social and cultural concerns. Specific vocabulary, case studies, and writing assignments are an integral part of the course.

Prerequisite: ENG* E043 or College Ready for ENG* E101 Composition (ENG* E101 is required for Certificate)
  • Credits: 3

BRE* E102 Tenant Services and Communication

This course is designed to provide an overview and practice of the interpersonal skills needed for a clerical position in a supportive/affordable housing setting. It provides ways to understand as well as to interacting effectively with the different population living in supportive housing. It surveys the front desk activities; such as - professional politeness in person and on the telephone; problem identification; problem solving; as well as common procedures for oral and written communications and complaints. We will explore common procedures for referring tenants to social services. Specific vocabulary, case studies, and writing assignment are an integral part of the course.

Prerequisite: ENG*E101 and Introduction to Property Management of Supportive and Affordable Housing BRE*E101
  • Credits: 3

BRE* E105 Desk Clerk Operations

This course provides an overview of desk clerk operations, procedures, crisis and conflict, and security. It explores the role of the front desk and the responsibilities of the position in affordable and supportive housing. It covers the areas of the front desk policies, safety and security, interaction with external agencies and authorities, interaction with tenants and non-tenants, confidentiality issues, and maintenance. Utilizing the property management software (Tenant Pro or similar software would be a plus). Forms, case studies, and writing assignments are part of the course.

Prerequisites: ENG*E101 and BRE*E101 Introduction to Property Management of Supportive and Affordable Housing
  • Credits: 4

BRE* E199 Property Management Clerk Internship

This course is the final requirement for the Property Management Clerk Certificate. It is designed to enable students to combine classroom training with practical property management clerk work experience through on-the-job training in a supportive or affordable housing project setting. This course will cover legal, ethical, and performance concerns, as well as interviewing and job placement skills. Seminars are held to discuss experiences, concerns, and topical questions. Students are required to keep a Journal and prepare a portfolio which will include a resume and cover letter, letters of recommendations, and other pertinent documents required for job placement in supportive and affordable housing. A minimum number of hours of on-site time is required for this course. Internship placement must be approved by the Department Chair. Writing assignments (journal and other writing assignments) are an integral part of this course.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101, BRE* E101, BRE* E103, and BRE* E105
  • Credits: 4

CAD* E110 Introduction to CAD

An introduction to the techniques of generating graphic images with computers, using AutoCAD. Topics include: overview of CAD technology, computer technology, hardware descriptions and requirements, file manipulation and management, two- dimensional geometric construction, symbol library creation, dimensioning, scaling, sectioning, plotting, detail and assembly drawing including tolerance studies.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory test scores in Reading, Writing and Math will be required. See program advisor.
  • Credits: 3

CAD* E133 CAD Mechanical AutoCad

This course emphasizes the use of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) for geometric construction; 3D modeling, orthographic projection; sectional and auxiliary views; and dimensioning and tolerancing. Assignments are completed using AutoCAD software. Traditional equipment is used to reinforce pictorial sketching and drawing techniques. Students taking this course are expected to have a background in blueprint reading.

Prerequisite: satisfactory score on placement exam or a grade of C or higher in MAT* E095
  • Credits: 3

CHE* E106 Chemistry and Art

Introduction of chemistry to non-science students as they develop an understanding of artists' materials, the science underlying art, and chemical interaction of the environment with art objects. Every key chemistry concept is connected with real life art application. From studying atoms and molecules, students are introduced to causes of color in pigments and dyes to understanding intermolecular forces in paints. Chemical reactions and acids and bases concepts are connected to problems with deterioration of work of art and methods of conservation and restoration help students to develop appreciation for practical chemistry. The hands on time employs these concepts to examine aspects of art media such as light, color dyes, paints, metals, stone, ceramics, glass, plastic, paper, and fiber.

Prerequisite: MAT* E137 or MAT* E104
  • Credits: 3

CHE* E111 Concepts of Chemistry

Introduction to the fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry. Atomic structure, periodic relationships, bonding, kinetics and equilibria are examined in sufficient depth to permit their use in understanding chemical reactions though in less detail than in CHE* E121 and CHE* E122. The laboratory program stresses the acquisition of skills in data gathering and in the manipulation of apparatus and materials.

3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

Prerequisite: MAT*137 or MAT*104 (grade "C" or better) and eligibility of ENG*101
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

CHE* E121 General Chemistry I

A study of the fundamental principles, theories, and laws of chemistry. Topics include atomic theory and the structure of the atom, the aggregated states of matter, kinetic-molecular theory, chemical bonding, stoichiometry and periodicity, solutions and colloids.

3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

Prerequisite: MAT* E137 or equivalent; Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG* E101
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

CHE* E122 General Chemistry II

A continuation of CHE* E121. Topics covered include thermochemistry, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, oxidation-reduction and electrochemistry, introduction to organic and nuclear chemistry and the chemistry of the elements and their compounds. The laboratory will include an introduction to semi-micro qualitative analysis.

3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

Prerequisite: CHE* E121
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

CHE* E211 Organic Chemistry I

An introduction to the organic chemistry of carbon. Primarily for students planning careers in the life and allied health sciences or a major in chemistry. The lectures will present an integrated analysis of the theoretical concepts and mechanisms of modern organic chemistry, organic reactions, synthetic methods, and instrumentation. Preparation properties and reactions of most of the major classes of aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic compounds will be discussed along with the more important living and non-living systems in which they function. The laboratory work will develop competence in the modern aspects of preparative and qualitative organic technique. 3 hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory.
Prerequisite: CHE* E122
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

CHE* E212 Organic Chemistry II

A continuation of CHE* E211. 3 hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory.
Prerequisite: CHE* E211
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: S

CJS* E101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course examines an overview of the criminal justice system on the local, state and federal levels in a democratic society. Students will be exposed to the historical, theoretical, philosophical and practical perspectives of the system’s police, court and correctional agencies. This course is required in the Criminal Justice major and is a prerequisite for all other Criminal Justice courses.

Prerequisite or parallel - ENG* E043 or placement into ENG* E101
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: SS

CJS* E102 Introduction to Corrections

An overview of the correctional system and its processes including history, sentencing, facilities, inmate populations, inmate rights, correctional programming, alternatives to incarceration and special populations.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E105 Introduction to Law Enforcement

A study of the role of police in American society. The course will examine the history and development of policing, hiring and training practices, administrative functions and other issues impacting on law enforcement.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E106 Introduction to Homeland Security

This overview course will address the history of homeland security, emergency preparedness and terrorist threats. Students will learn about problems and prospects of establishing aggressive intelligence and counterintelligence, and focus on specific issues relating to emergency management. The principles and practices of emergency planning and management will be emphasized in this course, along with an examination of current government reorganization and restructuring initiatives. The future of homeland security will also be discussed within the context of evolving technology, communications and modern security hazards.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E120 Police and the Community

An analysis of the problems of police as they relate to the community and the procedures used by departments to meet those problems. Students will be given the opportunity to study the police role in relation to the sociological and psychological dynamics of the community. The student will become knowledgeable in the practices which foster positive community relations and police-citizen communication.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101 and PSY* E111, and SOC* E101
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E139 Interviewing and Interrogation

A comprehensive overview of the processes of interviewing and interrogation. Students will be introduced to a variety of interview and interrogation techniques and strategies. The course will cover interviewing and interrogation of witnesses, victims, suspects and children. Students will perform mock interviews and interrogations to demonstrate their understanding of the course materials presented. Legal and ethical considerations involved will also be discussed.

Prerequisite: PSY* E111 and CJS* E101
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E201 Criminology

A study of crime and society's treatment of crime and the criminal. The various causes of crime and delinquency, the philosophy of criminal and correctional law, custody and treatment of offenders will be studied.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101 and PSY* E111 and SOC* E101
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E203 Juvenile Justice

A close examination of how the juvenile justice process has evolved and expanded as society has sought to understand, control, and influence change in the delinquent behavior of children and youth below the age of majority.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E211 Criminal Law I

An exploration of the scope and classification of criminal law as it relates to various types of offenses. The areas of criminal liability, inchoate offenses and intent will be discussed as well as the U.S. Constitution's relationship to criminal laws and how laws are made and enforced.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E213 Evidence and Criminal Procedure

A study of the U.S. Constitution, particularly the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment, as they relate to the functioning of the criminal justice system. Emphasis on individual rights, due process and civil liberties.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101 and POL* E111
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E220 Criminal Investigation

An introduction to the procedures and techniques of criminal investigation. Topics discussed will include the interview, interrogation, crime scene search, collection and preservation of evidence, and case preparation.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E221 Arson Investigation

An introduction to the problems and effects of arson; analysis of the chemistry of the fire scene; use of investigative and detection aids, photographs, measurements and diagrams; collection and preservation of evidence; methods of interviewing and interrogation; legal aspects of arson investigation.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E222 Computer Investigation Techniques

A comprehensive introduction to computer operations and computer system components with an emphasis on storage and retrieval of information for investigative purposes. Topics covered include basic operating systems, hardware, software, encryption, identification of evidentiary information, Internet servers and web sites, freeware, bulletin boards, file types and manipulations, spreadsheets and databases. Students will develop the ability to assemble evidence for a criminal investigation process. Substantial lab work is required.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101 and permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E225 Forensic Science

A study of the relationship of physical evidence to a specific crime or criminal. Discussion will include various methods of scientific development of physical evidence at crime scenes and under laboratory conditions. Emphasis will be placed on identification of suspects through physical, chemical or biological evidence.
Prerequisite: CJS* E220
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E237 Crime Scene Processing and Investigation

This course will apply basic criminal investigation skills to practical crime scene scenarios. Students will visit mock crime scenes, and process these scenes in their entirety. Hands-on instruction will concentrate on teaching students to effectively secure the scene and document the scene with sketches and digital photography. Students will learn proper crime scene note-taking and diagramming techniques. Students will also actively engage in searching for evidence, collecting evidence and creating chain-of-custody logs. Preparation for effective courtroom testimony will also be covered in this class.
Prerequisite: CJS* E220 or instructor approval
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E238 White Collar Crime

This course will examine the definitions and laws pertaining to white collar crime, as well as the practice, procedure and strategy concerning white collar criminal investigations and prosecutions. It will also provide an overview of the legal defense of white collar criminal cases. Topics addressed will include the criminology of white collar crime, investigative techniques used to combat white collar crime, prosecutorial discretion, legal privileges and common defenses. Indictments, sentencing and the goals of punishment will also be covered, along with a discussion of substantive law as it relates to specific types of white collar crimes.

Prerequisite: CJS* E101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E240 Correctional Administration

An examination of the correctional organization, the administrative process, and supervision and management in the correctional setting. Topics addressed will include values and ethics, policies and procedures, legal issues for employees, human resources, leadership, and power and influence.
Prerequisite: CJS* E102
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E244 Community-Based Corrections

An examination of the relationship between institutional confinement and community-based correctional programs. The organization and administration of probation and parole programs are examined. Special attention is given to the study of rehabilitative and community reintegration programs and activities.
Prerequisite: CJS* E102
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E250 Police Organization and Administration

A detailed analysis of police organization and administration. A study of administrative problems within a police organization and the equating of sound principles of human relations and supervision to effective police performance.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E251 Police Management Seminar

A practical application of previously studied theories and methods in police management. Students will use group work, case studies and projects to theoretically interpret and apply data in management situations.
Prerequisite: CJS* E250
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E259 Writing and Research for Law Enforcement

This course emphasizes the practical aspects of gathering, organizing and preparing written reports and other documents applicable to law enforcement. Students will practice the processes and procedures for creating and completing successful writing in the criminal justice field, make use of the technologies commonly used for research and writing in law enforcement, and learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage and documentation in the field.

Prerequisite: ENG* E102 and CJS* E101
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E280 Victimology

A comprehensive course designed to acquaint the student with the many issues faced by the victims of crime. Topics covered will include victimization and other issues central to crime victim assistance. Students will also gain an understanding of how to address the needs of crime victims and act as advocates for victim issues.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E285 Forensic Science with Laboratory

An introduction to the principles of forensic science with an emphasis on logical and scientific thinking as it applies to biological and chemical physical evidence. The laboratory portion of this course develops knowledge and skills in laboratory safety, investigative techniques and the use of scientific methodologies including observation and measurement. Topics include: the analysis of DNA, fingerprints, hair and fiber, soil, bone; microscopy; chromatography; and toxicology. Students will develop proper techniques and procedures for maintaining crime scene integrity and evidence in the laboratory. 

This course is equivalent to BIO* E208 & SCI* E285. Students can only receive credit for either BIO*E208, SCI* E285, CJS* E285. 4 credits. 3 hours lecture and 3 hours laboratory.

Prerequisite: CJS* E101 (CJ majors only), BIO* E105 or BIO* E121 and Eligible for ENG* E101 or ENG* E101W
  • Credits: 4

CJS* E290 Practicum in Criminal Justice

Supervised placement with a criminal justice agency to allow the student the opportunity to explore career choices while gaining actual job experience in the criminal justice field. Students will be required to participate a minimum of 8 hours per week (120 hours per semester) and to attend a bi-weekly meeting with the practicum advisor.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101 and CJS* E201 and CJS E*211 and CJS E*213, and permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E294 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice

A series of seminars covering topics of current interest in the criminal justice field. The criminal justice field changes very rapidly and this course will focus on areas of change such as ethics, use of force, Supreme Court decisions which affect criminal justice, prison issues, the drug problem and other issues which impact on the criminal justice system.
Prerequisite: CJS* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3

CJS* E295 Contemporary Issues in Forensic Science

A series of seminars covering topics pertaining to investigative techniques and the evaluation of evidence in criminal and civil cases.
Prerequisite: CJS* E220 and CJS* E225 and CJS* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3

COM* E101 Introduction to Mass Communications

Introduction to the main aspects of communications and how the mass media - newspapers, films, television, magazines, radio, and advertising - operate in our society. Material covered includes basic theories of mass communications, psychology of communications, development of mass media, and the interrelationships between the mass media and society, business, and government in defining issues and molding public opinion and attitudes.

Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG* E101
  • Credits: 3

COM* E116 Publications Workshop I

Practical experience in all aspects of writing, editing, managing, and designing through assignments on a variety of student-sponsored publications. Included will be work on the school newspaper, yearbook and literary magazine. This course uses computer word processing programs for the completion of assignments and production of publications.

Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG* E101
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: C

COM* E173 Public Speaking

Methods to improve effective speaking through study of pronunciation, diction, voice usage, and vocabulary. Through extemporaneous and other speeches, efforts will be made to improve confidence, organization of ideas, and effective deliver. Topics might include listening skills, control of nervousness, and the speaker's self-consciousness.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101
  • Credits: 3

COM* E201 Introduction to Public Relations

An overview of writing for public relations. Students will gain experience producing public relations materials such as news releases for print and broadcast media, newsletters, brochures, and materials for special events. The role of public relations planning and strategy will be discussed.
Prerequisite: ENG* E101
  • Credits: 3

COM* E216 Publications Workshop II

Designed to provide the student with broader publication experience and responsibility. These publications may include a school newspaper, a literary magazine, a yearbook, or other needed school publications. Students will learn such publication skills as feature writing, editorial writing, composition, layout, and sales. This course uses computer word processing programs for the completion of assignments and production of publications.

Prerequisite: COM* E116 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3

COM* E222 Basic News Writing

Instruction and practice in developing news articles, including defining news, gathering information from credible sources, recognizing and writing in basic news story structure and styles, and making ethical choices as a reporter. Assignments are completed using computers. This course satisfies the computer literacy requirement of the College, but it may not be used to satisfy the English requirement.
Prerequisite: ENG* E101
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: C

COM* E223 Feature and Magazine Writing

Review of basic information gathering, interviewing, and news writing techniques. Instruction and practice in feature reporting and writing, including in-depth and investigative features, opinion pieces, reviews, creative non-fiction, and writings for the online media. Assignments are completed using computers. This course satisfies the computer literacy requirement of the College, but it may not be used to satisfy the English requirement.
Prerequisite: COM* E222 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3

CSA* E105 Introduction to Software Applications

Provides an introduction to using the computer as a productivity tool. Students will use application software for word processing, spreadsheets and presentations. An introduction to file management using the Windows operating system will also be covered. Substantial lab time is required in the computer lab. The textbook and an on-line supplemental access code (bundle) are required.

Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG*E094
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: C

CSA* E106 Introduction to Computer Applications

An introduction to using the microcomputer as a productivity tool. Students will use application software for word processing, spreadsheets and databases. A comprehensive introduction to Windows will be presented along with the essentials of file management. Substantial lab time is required in the computer lab. The textbook and an on-line supplemental access code (bundle) are required.

Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG* E043. Basic computer touch-typing skills required
  • Credits: 4
  • Elective Code: B, C

CSA* E220 Web Graphics

A comprehensive introduction to the principles of computer science that form the basis of Internet graphics and multimedia. Topics include bitmap graphics, vector graphics, graphical file formats, compression techniques, interactive graphics, multimedia, and animation. The course requires substantial hands-on use of computer software packages such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Flash in the computer lab to illustrate these topics.
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B

CSC *E105 Programming Logic

An introductory course in computer programming designed to provide beginning programming students with an understanding of the fundamental logic principles used in the writing of computer programs. Topics include input/output, variables, data types, assignment statements, conditional structures, loops, arrays, and functions. The course requires substantial hands-on programming of computers in a computerized classroom environment.

Prerequisite: The ability to perform basic file management and word processing tasks using Microsoft Windows
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B, CS

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