Credit Courses

2015-2016 Catalog (Courses updated for 2016-2017)

Credit Courses





ECE* E295 Student Teaching Practicum

Guided observation, participation and supervised student teaching in NAEYC accredited centers or kindergartens are required. The purpose of student teaching is to enable the student to apply child development theory in a learning environment and to work with children under close supervision. Students will manage a classroom independently, plan, organize, implement and evaluate classroom activities. Students will complete a minimum of 200 hours of student teaching. Weekly seminars devoted to issues in early childhood education and the experience of the student teacher will extend the individual's learning experience.
Prerequisites: All Early Childhood courses unless approved by the ECE advisor and ECE* E222 with a grade of C or better.
  • Credits: 6

ECN* E101 Principles of Macro-Economics

A study of the economic system as a whole, concentrating on the U.S. including the general structure of business in the U.S.; the creation and control of the money supply; the components of aggregate demand; recessions and inflation; the interrelated roles of government and business; and international trade and exchange are covered.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B, SS

ECN* E102 Principles of Micro-Economics

A study of market directed and mixed economies, emphasizing the American experience. The theory and facts of economic growth are covered. Emphasis is on market models and factor pricing. Alternative economic systems and current problems are surveyed. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of line graphs.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B, SS

ECN* E170 Economic Geography

An examination of natural and cultural factors affecting production and consumption of goods and services and spatial distribution of economic activities. Location theories are stressed. The systematic approach is emphasized primarily, but consideration is given to the regional approach. People-land relationships are considered in terms of physical and socio-economic patterns.

Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B, SS

ECN* E180 History of Economic Thought

A survey of the great ideas on which economics is based using the historical approach. The student is introduced to the concepts and tools of economics and to the relationships between economics and society. Not open as a credit elective for Business majors.

Prerequisite or Parallel: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: B, SS

EDU* E 201 Foundations in Education

This course has not been approved for HCC, it can be taken at SCSU as part of the Pathways to Teaching program

  • Credits: 3

EGR* E111 Introduction to Engineering

Students will be introduced to the fields of engineering through design and graphics and comprehensive engineering projects. Topics include sketching, charts, graphs, forces, energy, electrical circuits, mechanisms, materials testing, manufacturing technologies and fundamentals of engineering economics.

Prerequisites: MAT* E104 or MAT* E137 or placement into MAT* E167 or higher
  • Credits: 3

EGR* E211 Engineering Statics

A study of engineering mechanics via vector approach to static forces and their resolution. Topics include: properties of force systems, free-body analysis, first and second moments of areas and mass, and static friction. Applications to trusses, frames, beams and cables included.

Prerequisite or Parallel: MAT* E256, Calculus II
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: S

EGR* E212 Engineering Dynamics

A study of Newtonian mechanics to dynamic forces, translational motion, work, impulse and momentum will be taught. Topics included: kinematics, kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, vibrations, energy and momentum conservation.

Prerequisite: EGR* E211
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: S

EGR* E214 Engineering Thermodynamics

This course covers energy concepts and balances; basic definitions including the first and second laws of thermodynamics; ideal and real gases; thermodynamic properties; and introductory cycle analysis.

Prerequisite: PHY* 221 and MAT* 254
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: S

ENG* E003 Foundations of Reading

Provides students with essential reading skills such as decoding skills, phonetic and structural analysis skills, vocabulary development and reading comprehension in order to provide students with a basic reading foundation.

This course will not satisfy graduation requirements.

Prerequisite: Placement test score
  • Credits: 3

ENG* E013 Writing Foundations of English

A practical application of grammar by intensive practice in writing short passages to achieve competence in writing grammatically sound sentences and paragraphs. This course also is an introduction to the writing process by practical application of pre-writing, drafting, and revising techniques to writing short passages.

This course will not satisfy graduation requirements. ENG* E003 or ENG* E092 may be taken concurrently.

Prerequisite: Placement test score
  • Credits: 3

ENG* E043 Writing: Paragraph to Essay

A comprehensive study of the paragraph as a unit of composition, emphasizing organization of ideas, specific methods of development, and elements of style. The subject matter will include the grammar and syntax of sentence patterns, punctuation, and the mechanics of formal college writing. Frequent writing assignments both in and out of class will be conducted in a workshop manner.

This course will not satisfy graduation requirements.

Prerequisite: Placement test score or "C" in ENG* E013. Prerequisite or parallel: DS E099
  • Credits: 3

ENG* E073 Academic Reading

Provides students with advanced work in reading skills (literal meaning, inference, critical thinking, and interpretation and evaluation) along with vocabulary development (dictionary and library skills) in preparation for general college studies. Prepares students for college-level reading in a variety of subjects.

This course will not satisfy graduation requirements. ENG* E013, ENG* E043 or ENG* E101 may be taken concurrently.

Prerequisite: Placement test score or "C" in ENG* E003. Prerequisite or parallel: DS E099
  • Credits: 3

ENG* E092 Introduction to College Reading

This course prepares students for the reading demands in ENG*101 and other college-level courses by integrating reading and critical thinking. Students will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their reading skills. Students will learn and practice specific college-level skills through critical reading, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. ENG* E094 must be taken concurrently if student places into ENG* E092 and ENG* E094.

Prerequisite: Placement test score or successful completion of transitional program in reading
Prerequisite Or Parallel: DS E099 or FS E100
  • Credits: 3

ENG* E092I Introduction to College Reading INTENSIVE

This course prepares students for the reading demands in ENG*101 and other college-level courses by integrating reading and critical thinking. Students will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their reading skills. Students will learn and practice specific college-level skills through critical reading, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. ENG* E094 or ENG* E094i must be taken concurrently if student places into ENG* E092i and ENG* E094 or ENG* E094i.

Prerequisite: Placement test score
  • Credits: 6

ENG* E093 Introduction to College Reading and Writing

This course will provide students with advanced work in reading skills (literal meaning, inference, critical thinking, interpretation and evaluation) and writing skills (organization of ideas, specific methods of development, elements of style, and writing process) in preparation for college level reading and writing in a variety of subjects. The course focuses on reading and writing as processes and explores the natural link between careful reading and good writing. The course will prepare students for college level reading and writing in a variety of subjects. Students who pass this class with a grade of ?C? or better satisfy any requirement for ENG 043 and ENG 073. This course will not satisfy graduation requirements.

Prequisite or Parallel: Placement into course by Accuplacer scores of 78-87 on sentence skills and 83-93 on Reading Comprehension and DS 099.Parallel: DS 099
  • Credits: 3

ENG* E094 Introduction to College Writing

This course prepares students for the writing demands in ENG*101 and other college-level courses by integrating writing and critical thinking. Student writing will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their skills in exposition, interpretation, and argumentation. Students will learn and practice specific college-level skills through writing, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. ENG* 092 must be taken concurrently if student places into ENG* E092 and ENG* E094.

Prerequisite: Placement test score or successful completion of transitional program in writing
Prerequisite or Parallel: DS 099 or FS100
  • Credits: 3

ENG* E094I Introduction to College Writing INTENSIVE

This course prepares students for the writing demands in ENG* E101 and other college-level courses by integrating writing and critical thinking. Student writing will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their skills in exposition, interpretation, and argumentation. Students will learn and practice specific college-level skills through writing, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. ENG* E092 or ENG* E092i must be taken concurrently if student places into ENG* E094i and ENG* E092 or ENG* E092i.

Prerequisite: Placement test score
  • Credits: 6

ENG* E101 Composition

The study of skills necessary for effective written communication. The course includes analyses of outstanding non-fiction prose works. The principles of rhetoric and logic are also applied in frequent writing assignments.

Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on placement examination OR passing BOTH courses in one of the following course sets with a grade of C or higher: [ENG 043 and ENG 073] OR [ENG 092 and ENG 094]
  • Credits: 3

ENG* E101W English Composition Workshop

This workshop provides support for the material covered in ENG*101, and is to be taken in conjunction with the corresponding section of ENG*101. The workshop focuses on further examination of and development of strong sentence, paragraph and essay structures necessary for college level writing. The close reading of texts will model effective writing, and students will make heavy use of the writing process and peer workshopping to develop their ENG*101 assignments.
Prerequisite: Appropriate score on placement examination.
  • Credits: 3

ENG* E102 Literature & Composition

A continuation of ENG* E101, including analyses of works of fiction, poetry, and drama to introduce techniques such as irony, satire, point of view, and figurative uses of language. Assignments encourage analytical reading and writing. The course also focuses on research techniques to be applied to a documented paper.
Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ENG* E101
  • Credits: 3

ENG* E213 Poetry

This course examines the nature and variety of poetry to foster competence and pleasure in the reading, understanding and evaluation of poems as works of art. The course focuses on how poems work, examining elements critical to poetry, such as imagery, figurative language, symbol, diction, voice, rhythm, rhyme and structure. Elements of form, such as the employment of open, closed and traditional forms, may also be included. Close examination of poems will foster an understanding of both the historical context of some particular poems and of how understanding poetic techniques adds to the delight of reading and understanding poetry, thereby giving students the confidence and competence to approach more advanced levels of reading literature, whether formally or informally. Students will engage in the close reading and analysis of a wide range of poems written in the English language, and possibly some poems in translation from other languages. Students will be called upon to employ their skills in close reading, analysis and research in their writing assignments.

Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E214 Drama

This course is an exploration of the genre of drama as a literary form. Each dramatic piece, both tragedies and comedies, will be read and analyzed structurally, thematically, historically, and artistically. Works by classic playwrights as well as major figures from the great ages of drama are included.
Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E221 American Literature I

Close reading of selected major works of American Literature from colonial times to the close of the nineteenth century. Emphasis will be placed upon the social and cultural implications of the works as well as upon their relevance to our own time. Major concentration will be on such writers as Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Whitman, Crane, James, Twain, and Dickinson.
Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E222 American Literature II

A study of the major works of American Literature from the close of the nineteenth century to the present. Particular attention is given to the social and cultural implications of the works of such writers as Frost, Fitzgerald, Eliot, Hemingway, Faulkner, O'Neill, Steinbeck, Williams, and Ellison.
Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E231 British Literature I

A chronological survey of the major works of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 18th century. Works may include those of the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Pope, and Swift. Works will be related to their historical and cultural settings.
Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E232 British Literature II

A chronological survey of the major works of English literature during the 19th and the 20th centuries, including those of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Hopkins, Yeats, and Eliot. Works will be related to their historical and cultural settings.
Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E233 Shakespeare

Detailed study of the major works of Shakespeare, such as sonnets, histories, comedies, romances, and tragedies from both a literary and theatrical perspective. Works will be related to their historical and cultural settings.

Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E241 World Literature I

A study of the major literary works of the western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance, including the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament), Greek mythology, the Iliad, Greek dramas, Roman mythology, the Aeneid, the New Testament, and the Divine Comedy.
Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E242 World Literature II

A detailed study of the major literary works of the Western world from the Renaissance to recent times. Works may include philosophical works of Descartes and Pascal, comedies of Moliere, tragedies of Racine, Voltaire's Candide, Goethe's Faust, and works of Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Gorki, Mann, Sartre, and others.
Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E245 Early Western Literature

A study of major literary works of the Western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance, including the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament), Greek mythology, the Iliad, Greek dramas, Roman mythology, the Aeneid, the New Testament, and the Divine Comedy.

Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E246 Modern Western Literature

A detailed study of the major literary works of the Western world from the Renaissance to recent times. Works may include philosophical works of Descartes and Pascal, comedies of Moliere, tragedies of Racine, Voltaire’s Candide, Goethe’s Faust, and works of Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Gorki, Mann, Sartre, and others.

Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E251 African American Literature

This course is an introduction to the literature of the African American diaspora with significant emphasis on the cultural and historical perspectives emerging from the literature. Short stories, poetry, drama, novels, and essays are covered.
Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E262 Women in Literature

This course involves a study of women in literature. The course focus is on the way women find their voice as writers, examining how gender bias, social and economic class, and ethnicity and race impact the way women express themselves. Fiction, drama, and poetry are all included.

Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E271 Film and Literature

A close analysis of novels and their relationship to film adaptations made from them. Although some attention will be given to the nature and esthetics of film, emphasis will be on the literature itself. Relationships between the two genres might include the use of language, concreteness, perception, and handling of time as well as more traditional comparisons involving plot, character, setting, and theme.
Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E278 Contemporary Literature

A study of representative post World War II writers from various geographic areas of the globe who reflect philosophies, movements, and styles that influence present-day attitudes. Works discussed will be from American, British, and world traditions, with emphasis placed on culturally diverse movements and on new developments in literary studies.

Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ENG* E281 Creative Writing

A study and application in a seminar atmosphere of creative writing techniques, including, but not necessarily limited to, fiction and poetry. Intensive study of fiction by the world's great writers to discover and understand the techniques used will serve as a starting point for individual work by students. Examination and practice of the techniques of poetry writing will also be offered. Work produced will be discussed and critically evaluated by the class. When possible, meetings and discussions with established writers will be arranged. This course cannot be used as a Humanities elective.
Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: F

ENG* E282 Creative Writing- Poetry

This course is a study and application in a seminar atmosphere of poetry writing techniques. Intensive study of poetry by the world's great poets and contemporary poets to discover and understand the techniques used will serve as a starting point for individual work by students. The goal of this seminar is to develop the student’s ability in elements essential to the craft of poetry, including the use of vibrant imagery, effective line breaks and communicative language choices. Focusing on these basic elements will strengthen the work of both new and experienced poets. In order to build skill in these and other techniques as well as varied approaches to the creative process, students will be asked to make use of the techniques studied in frequent poetry writing assignments. Work produced will be discussed and critically evaluated by the class. When possible, meetings and discussions with established writers will be arranged. No previous experience with creative writing or the study of poetry is required.This course cannot be used as a Humanities elective.

Prerequisite: ENG* E101 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: F

ENG* E298 Special Topics in English

An opportunity to explore a variety of literary types in a less conventional setting than in the period courses. Topics will be varied by semester and by instructor's specialty. Among the special topics alternating by semesters are: Women in Literature; Mythology; Masterpieces of the Drama; Irish Literature; Hispanic Literature; Black Literature; Enduring Themes in Literature; Fiction & Film; Jewish Writing of the 20th Century; and the Holocaust.
Prerequisite: ENG* E102
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ESL* E010 Combined Skills I

A beginner-level language course for non-native students with limited English experience who need an introduction to the basic sounds, structures, and vocabulary of spoken and written English. Includes listening comprehension and speaking skills, basic vocabulary and grammar study, and elementary reading and writing practice. Adult basic literacy, including cursive writing, is assumed. Two hours of laboratory/tutorial practice is required per week.

This course will not satisfy graduation requirements.

Prerequisite: ESL interview and placement test
  • Credits: 6

ESL* E015 Grammar I

An intensive language course for high-beginner and low-intermediate, non-native students who want to develop competency in the use of basic grammatical structures in everyday situations. The course provides students the opportunity to learn these structures through daily reading and language analysis exercises, speaking and writing practice. This course does not satisfy graduation requirements.
Prerequisite: Placement at ESL* E010 or ESL* E020
  • Credits: 3

ESL* E020 Combined Skills II

A high beginner-level language course for non-native students who need to develop confidence and fluency in speaking and writing practical English for everyday use. Includes listening comprehension and speaking skills, general vocabulary, basic grammar, and simple reading and writing practice. Two hours of laboratory/tutorial practice required per week. Does not satisfy graduation requirements.
Prerequisite: ESL* E010 or ESL interview and placement test
  • Credits: 6

ESL* E130 Combined Skills III

An academically-oriented language course for non-native students who have a simple knowledge of spoken and written English. Emphasizes intensive general academic vocabulary development, extensive reading and listening comprehension, major aspects of sentence structure and grammar, and speaking and writing improvement using linguistically controlled materials. Two hours of laboratory/tutorial practice required per week. Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
Prerequisite: ESL placement test
  • Credits: 6
  • Elective Code: H

ESL* E135 Grammar III

An intensive language course for non-native students who want to develop competency in the use of intermediate grammatical structures in practical and academic contexts. The course provides students the opportunity to learn these structures through daily reading and language analysis exercises, speaking and writing practice. Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
Prerequisite: Completion of ESL* E020 with a grade of "C" or higher, or placement at ESL* E130
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ESL* E140 Combined Skills IV

Helps intermediate level ESL students improve their reading and writing skills and provides practice in listening and speaking. Reading assignments stress comprehension and vocabulary building. Writing skills focus on developing basic sentence structure and simple paragraphs. Students listen to taped lectures, practice dictation and note-taking, and participate in structured group discussions. All activities focus on expanding knowledge of English and developing fluency in all skills. Two hours of laboratory/tutorial practice required per week. Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
Prerequisite: ESL placement test or ESL* E130
  • Credits: 6
  • Elective Code: H

ESL* E147 Oral Communications IV

A speech improvement course to help intermediate-level non-native speakers of English to communicate more effectively in everyday situations and in academic settings. Focus is on developing greater clarity and fluency in spoken English through daily listening discrimination and pronunciation exercises; peer observation and interaction; guided group discussions and individual oral presentations. One hour of laboratory or tutorial practice required per week. Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
Prerequisite: ESL* E130 or permission of the instructor
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ESL* E150 Combined Skills V

An advanced language course for non-native students who have developed basic fluency in written and spoken English and who wish to further improve their language skills for academic or career purposes. Emphasizes intensive academic vocabulary development, extensive reading practice using short and long selections of general interest from academic subjects and literary works, individual pronunciation and oral presentations. Elements of effective writing, including problems in advanced syntax and sentence structure, are applied in short essays and longer writings such as autobiographies and book reports. Two hours of laboratory/tutorial practice required per week. Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
Prerequisite: ESL placement test or ESL* E140
  • Credits: 6
  • Elective Code: H

ESL* E155 Grammar V

An intensive language course for non-native students who want to develop competency in the use of advanced grammatical structures in academic contexts. The course provides students the opportunity to master these structures through daily reading and language analysis exercises, group discussion and essay writing. Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
Prerequisite: Completion of ESL* E140 with a grade of "C" or higher, or placement at ESL* E150
  • Credits: 3
  • Elective Code: H

ESL* E160 Combined Skills VI

Helps advanced ESL students expand and refine their reading, listening, speaking and writing skills for more effective communications in college and career settings. Students read non-fiction and fiction relating to North American culture and other subjects, discuss readings in small groups, then respond to readings by writing essays, summaries and reports. Students listen to taped lectures, dialogues and narratives from radio and television, and present oral reports and debates on selected topics. Activities focus on developing fluency, clarity and correctness of expression. Two hours of laboratory/tutorial practice required per week. Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
Prerequisite: ESL placement test or ESL* E150
  • Credits: 6
  • Elective Code: H

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  • Housatonic Community College
  • 900 Lafayette Blvd., Bridgeport, CT 06604
  • (203) 332-5000