Feb 21, 2020  
2018-2019 Academic Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

    

To search for courses by Elective Code enter the code in quotes (i.e. “AESX”, “FINA”, etc.) in the Keyword or Phrase field. Be sure to use quotes!


 

 

Electives

  
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    Elective (QUAX) - Quantitative Reasoning (3-4 credits)


     
    Quantitative Reasoning electives are all courses with Elective Code QUAX, typically used for CSCU Transfer Degrees.

    See the list of currently available courses here: PDF_CSCU Transfer Electives  

  
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    Elective (Restricted) - Programming Language (3-4 credits)


     
    Refer to the footnote for a list of appropriate courses.

  
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    Elective (SCI) - Science (3-4 credits)


     
    Science electives are all courses with Elective Code SCI.

  
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    Elective (SCKX) - Scientific Knowledge & Understanding (3-4 credits)


     
    Scientific Knowledge & Understanding electives are all courses with Elective Code SCKX, typically used for CSCU Transfer Degrees.

    See the list of currently available courses here: PDF_CSCU Transfer Electives  

  
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    Elective (SCRX) - Scientific Reasoning (3-4 credits)


     
    Scientific Reasoning electives are all courses with Elective Code SCRX, typically used for CSCU Transfer Degrees.

    See the list of currently available courses here: PDF_CSCU Transfer Electives  

  
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    Elective (SOCX) - Social Phenomena I (3 credits)


     
    Social Phenomena & Understanding I electives are all courses with Elective Code SOCX, typically used for CSCU Transfer Degrees.

    See the list of currently available courses here: PDF_CSCU Transfer Electives  

  
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    Elective (SOPX) - Social Phenomena II (3 credits)


     
    Social Phenomena & Understanding II electives are all courses with Elective Code SOPX, typically used for CSCU Transfer Degrees.

    See the list of currently available courses here: PDF_CSCU Transfer Electives  

  
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    Elective (SSCI) - Social Science (3 credits)


     
    Social Science electives are all courses with Elective Code SSCI, typically used for CSCU Transfer Degrees.

    See the list of currently available courses here: PDF_CSCU Transfer Electives  

  
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    Elective (WRCX) - Written Communication in English I (3 credits)


     
    Written Communication in English I electives are all courses with Elective Code WRCX, typically used for CSCU Transfer Degrees.

    See the list of currently available courses here: PDF_CSCU Transfer Electives  

  
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    Elective (WRIX) - Written Communication in English II (3 credits)


     
    Written Communication in English II electives are all courses with Elective Code WRIX, typically used for CSCU Transfer Degrees.

    See the list of currently available courses here: PDF_CSCU Transfer Electives  


Engineering Science (EGR)

  
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    EGR* E111 - Introduction to Engineering (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): MAT* E104  or MAT* E137  or placement into MAT* E167  or higher
     
    Students will be introduced to the fields of engineering through design and graphics and comprehensive engineering projects. Topics include sketching, charts, graphs, forces, energy, electrical circuits, mechanisms, materials testing, manufacturing technologies and fundamentals of engineering economics. Course Outline: EGR 111  

  
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    EGR* E211 - Engineering Statics (3 credits)


    Code(s): SCI
    Prerequisite(s) or Parallel(s): MAT* E256 , Calculus II
     
    A study of engineering mechanics via vector approach to static forces and their resolution. Topics include: properties of force systems, free-body analysis, first and second moments of areas and mass, and static friction. Applications to trusses, frames, beams and cables included. Course Outline: EGR 211  

  
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    EGR* E212 - Engineering Dynamics (3 credits)


    Code(s): SCI
    Prerequisite(s): EGR* E211  
     
    A study of Newtonian mechanics to dynamic forces, translational motion, work, impulse and momentum will be taught. Topics included: kinematics, kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, vibrations, energy and momentum conservation. Course Outline: EGR 212  

  
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    EGR* E214 - Engineering Thermodynamics (3 credits)


    Code(s): SCI
    Prerequisite(s): PHY* E221  and MAT* E254  
     
    This course covers energy concepts and balances; basic definitions including the first and second laws of thermodynamics; ideal and real gases; thermodynamic properties; and introductory cycle analysis. Course Outline: EGR 214  


English (ENG)

  
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    ENG* E092 - Introduction to College Reading (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): Placement test score or successful completion of transitional program in reading
    Prerequisite(s) or Parallel(s): DS 099 or FS E100  
     
    This course prepares students for the reading demands in ENG* E101  and other college-level courses by integrating reading and critical thinking. Students will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their reading skills. Students will learn and practice specific college-level skills through critical reading, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops. Course Outline: ENG 092  

    This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. ENG* E094  must be taken concurrently if student places into ENG* E092 and ENG* E094 .
  
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    ENG* E092I - Introduction to College Reading INTENSIVE (6 credits)


     
    This course prepares students for the reading demands in ENG* E101  and other college-level courses by integrating reading and critical thinking. Students will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their reading skills. Students will learn and practice specific college-level skills through critical reading, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops. Course Outline: ENG 092I  

    This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. ENG* E094  or ENG* E094I  must be taken concurrently if student places into ENG* E092i and ENG* E094  or ENG* E094I .
  
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    ENG* E093 - Introduction to College Reading and Writing (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): Placement into course by Next Generation Reading score of 245-250
    Corequisite(s): FS E100 - Freshman Seminar (3 credits)  
     
    This course provides students with advanced work in reading skills (literal meaning, inference, critical thinking, interpretation and evaluation) and writing skills (organization of ideas, specific methods of development, elements of style, and writing process) in preparation for college level reading and writing in a variety of subjects. The course focuses on reading and writing as processes and explores the natural link between careful reading and good writing. The course will prepare students for college level reading and writing in a variety of subjects. This course will not satisfy graduation requirements.

  
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    ENG* E094 - Introduction to College Writing (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): Placement test score or successful completion of transitional program in writing
    Prerequisite(s) or Parallel(s): DS 099 or FS E100  
     
    This course prepares students for the writing demands in ENG* E101  and other college-level courses by integrating writing and critical thinking. Student writing will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their skills in exposition, interpretation, and argumentation. Students will learn and practice specific college-level skills through writing, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops. Course Outline: ENG 094  

    This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. ENG* E092  must be taken concurrently if student places into ENG* E092  and ENG* E094.
  
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    ENG* E094I - Introduction to College Writing INTENSIVE (6 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): Placement test score
     
    This course prepares students for the writing demands in ENG* E101  and other college-level courses by integrating writing and critical thinking. Student writing will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their skills in exposition, interpretation, and argumentation. Students will learn and practice specific college-level skills through writing, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops. Course Outline: ENG 094I  

    This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. ENG* E092  must be taken concurrently if student places into ENG* E092  and ENG* E094 .
  
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    ENG* E101 - Composition (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory score on placement examination OR passing BOTH courses in one of the following course sets with a grade of C or higher: [ENG* E043 and ENG* E073] OR [ENG* E092  and ENG* E094 ]
     
    The study of skills necessary for effective written communication. The course includes analyses of outstanding non-fiction prose works. The principles of rhetoric and logic are also applied in frequent writing assignments. Course Outline: ENG 101  

  
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    ENG* E101W - English Composition Workshop (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): Appropriate score on placement examination.
     
    This workshop provides support for the material covered in ENG* E101  and is to be taken in conjunction with the corresponding section of ENG*101. The workshop focuses on further examination of and development of strong sentence, paragraph and essay structures necessary for college level writing. The close reading of texts will model effective writing, and students will make heavy use of the writing process and peer workshopping to develop their ENG* E101  assignments.

  
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    ENG* E102 - Literature & Composition (3 credits)


    Code(s): WRIX
    Prerequisite(s): A grade of “C” or higher in ENG* E101  
     
    A continuation of ENG* E101 , including analyses of works of fiction, poetry, and drama to introduce techniques such as irony, satire, point of view, and figurative uses of language. Assignments encourage analytical reading and writing. The course also focuses on research techniques to be applied to a documented paper. Course Outline: ENG 102  

  
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    ENG* E202 - Technical Writing (3 credits)


    Code(s): WRIX
    Prerequisite(s): C or better in ENG* E101   or permission of instructor
     
    Provides directed practice in writing and speaking skills needed in technical fields for specific audiences. Students create documentation for technical systems, including formal and informal reports, abstracts and reviews. Students will learn strategies for producing such reports successfully, including planning, analyzing, purpose and audience, gathering data, and developing revising techniques and oral presentations. Students will be encouraged to choose topics based on their major or intended career.  Recommended for students in pre-technical programs. Course Outline: ENG 202  

  
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    ENG* E213 - Poetry (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HISX, HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    This course examines the nature and variety of poetry to foster competence and pleasure in the reading, understanding and evaluation of poems as works of art. The course focuses on how poems work, examining elements critical to poetry, such as imagery, figurative language, symbol, diction, voice, rhythm, rhyme and structure. Elements of form, such as the employment of open, closed and traditional forms, may also be included. Close examination of poems will foster an understanding of both the historical context of some particular poems and of how understanding poetic techniques adds to the delight of reading and understanding poetry, thereby giving students the confidence and competence to approach more advanced levels of reading literature, whether formally or informally. Students will engage in the close reading and analysis of a wide range of poems written in the English language, and possibly some poems in translation from other languages. Students will be called upon to employ their skills in close reading, analysis and research in their writing assignments. Course Outline: ENG 213  

  
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    ENG* E214 - Drama (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    This course is an exploration of the genre of drama as a literary form. Each dramatic piece, both tragedies and comedies, will be read and analyzed structurally, thematically, historically, and artistically. Works by classic playwrights as well as major figures from the great ages of drama are included. Course Outline: ENG 214  

  
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    ENG* E221 - American Literature I (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    Close reading of selected major works of American Literature from colonial times to the close of the nineteenth century. Emphasis will be placed upon the social and cultural implications of the works as well as upon their relevance to our own time. Major concentration will be on such writers as Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Whitman, Crane, James, Twain, and Dickinson. Course Outline: ENG 221  

  
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    ENG* E222 - American Literature II (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    A study of the major works of American Literature from the close of the nineteenth century to the present. Particular attention is given to the social and cultural implications of the works of such writers as Frost, Fitzgerald, Eliot, Hemingway, Faulkner, O’Neill, Steinbeck, Williams, and Ellison. Course Outline: ENG 222  

  
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    ENG* E231 - British Literature I (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    A chronological survey of the major works of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 18th century. Works may include those of the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Pope, and Swift. Works will be related to their historical and cultural settings. Course Outline: ENG 231  

  
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    ENG* E232 - British Literature II (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    A chronological survey of the major works of English literature during the 19th and the 20th centuries, including those of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Hopkins, Yeats, and Eliot. Works will be related to their historical and cultural settings. Course Outline: ENG 232  

  
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    ENG* E233 - Shakespeare (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    Detailed study of the major works of Shakespeare, such as sonnets, histories, comedies, romances, and tragedies from both a literary and theatrical perspective. Works will be related to their historical and cultural settings. Course Outline: ENG 233  

  
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    ENG* E241 - World Literature I (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    A study of the major literary works of the western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance, including the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament), Greek mythology, the Iliad, Greek dramas, Roman mythology, the Aeneid, the New Testament, and the Divine Comedy. Course Outline: ENG 241  

  
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    ENG* E242 - World Literature II (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102 
     
    A detailed study of the major literary works of the Western world from the Renaissance to recent times. Works may include philosophical works of Descartes and Pascal, comedies of Moliere, tragedies of Racine, Voltaire’s Candide Goethe’s Faust, and works of Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Gorki, Mann, Sartre, and others.

  
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    ENG* E245 - Early Western Literature (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102 
     
    A study of major literary works of the Western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance, including the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament), Greek mythology, the Iliad, Greek dramas, Roman mythology, the Aeneid, the New Testament, and the Divine Comedy.

  
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    ENG* E246 - Modern Western Literature (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    A detailed study of the major literary works of the Western world from the Renaissance to recent times. Works may include philosophical works of Descartes and Pascal, comedies of Moliere, tragedies of Racine, Voltaire’s Candide, Goethe’s Faust, and works of Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Gorki, Mann, Sartre, and others.

  
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    ENG* E251 - African American Literature (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HISX, HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    This course is an introduction to the literature of the African American diaspora with significant emphasis on the cultural and historical perspectives emerging from the literature. Short stories, poetry, drama, novels, and essays are covered. Course Outline: ENG 251  

  
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    ENG* E262 - Women in Literature (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    This course involves a study of women in literature. The course focus is on the way women find their voice as writers, examining how gender bias, social and economic class, and ethnicity and race impact the way women express themselves. Fiction, drama, and poetry are all included. Course Outline: ENG 262  

  
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    ENG* E271 - Film and Literature (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    A close analysis of novels and their relationship to film adaptations made from them. Although some attention will be given to the nature and esthetics of film, emphasis will be on the literature itself. Relationships between the two genres might include the use of language, concreteness, perception, and handling of time as well as more traditional comparisons involving plot, character, setting, and theme. Course Outline: ENG 271  

  
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    ENG* E277 - Science Fiction and Society (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    In this course, students will develop skills in understanding and appreciating the genre of science fiction. Additionally, students will apply critical methodologies and investigate relationships between science fiction and society, thus confirming their skills of analysis and writing. Particular approaches to science fiction will involve Marxist, feminist, gender, psychoanalytical, and anthropological critical theories. Anthropological critical theory will include colonialism and social identity (i.e., ethnocentrism, xenocentrism, folk definitions of the Other).

  
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    ENG* E278 - Contemporary Literature (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    A study of representative post World War II writers from various geographic areas of the globe who reflect philosophies, movements, and styles that influence present-day attitudes. Works discussed will be from American, British, and world traditions, with emphasis placed on culturally diverse movements and on new developments in literary studies. Course Outline: ENG 278  

  
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    ENG* E281 - Creative Writing (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, CRTY, FINA
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E101  or permission of the instructor
     
    A study and application in a seminar atmosphere of creative writing techniques, including, but not necessarily limited to, fiction and poetry. Intensive study of fiction by the world’s great writers to discover and understand the techniques used will serve as a starting point for individual work by students. Examination and practice of the techniques of poetry writing will also be offered. Work produced will be discussed and critically evaluated by the class. When possible, meetings and discussions with established writers will be arranged. Course Outline: ENG 281  

    This course cannot be used as a Humanities elective.
  
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    ENG* E282 - Creative Writing- Poetry (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, FINA
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E101  or permission of the instructor
     
    This course is a study and application in a seminar atmosphere of poetry writing techniques. Intensive study of poetry by the world’s great poets and contemporary poets to discover and understand the techniques used will serve as a starting point for individual work by students. The goal of this seminar is to develop the student’s ability in elements essential to the craft of poetry, including the use of vibrant imagery, effective line breaks and communicative language choices. Focusing on these basic elements will strengthen the work of both new and experienced poets. In order to build skill in these and other techniques as well as varied approaches to the creative process, students will be asked to make use of the techniques studied in frequent poetry writing assignments. Work produced will be discussed and critically evaluated by the class. When possible, meetings and discussions with established writers will be arranged. No previous experience with creative writing or the study of poetry is required. Course Outline: ENG 282  

    This course cannot be used as a Humanities elective.
  
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    ENG* E298 - Special Topics in English (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  
     
    An opportunity to explore a variety of literary types in a less conventional setting than in the period courses. Topics will be varied by semester and by instructor’s specialty. Among the special topics alternating by semesters are: Women in Literature; Mythology; Masterpieces of the Drama; Irish Literature; Hispanic Literature; Black Literature; Enduring Themes in Literature; Fiction & Film; Jewish Writing of the 20th Century; and the Holocaust. Course Outline: ENG 298  


English As A Second Language (ESL)

  
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    ESL* E010 - Combined Skills I (6 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): ESL interview and placement test
     
    A beginner-level language course for non-native students with limited English experience who need an introduction to the basic sounds, structures, and vocabulary of spoken and written English. Includes listening comprehension and speaking skills, basic vocabulary and grammar study, and elementary reading and writing practice. Adult basic literacy, including cursive writing, is assumed. Two hours of laboratory/tutorial practice is required per week. Course Outline: ESL 010  

    This course will not satisfy graduation requirements.
  
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    ESL* E015 - Grammar I (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): Placement at ESL* E010  or ESL* E020  
     
    An intensive language course for high-beginner and low-intermediate, non-native students who want to develop competency in the use of basic grammatical structures in everyday situations. The course provides students the opportunity to learn these structures through daily reading and language analysis exercises, speaking and writing practice. Course Outline: ESL 015  

    This course does not satisfy graduation requirements.
  
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    ESL* E020 - Combined Skills II (6 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): ESL* E010  or ESL interview and placement test
     
    A high beginner-level language course for non-native students who need to develop confidence and fluency in speaking and writing practical English for everyday use. Includes listening comprehension and speaking skills, general vocabulary, basic grammar, and simple reading and writing practice. Course Outline: ESL 020  

    Two hours of laboratory/tutorial practice required per week. Does not satisfy graduation requirements.
  
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    ESL* E130 - Combined Skills III (6 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ESL placement test
     
    An academically-oriented language course for non-native students who have a simple knowledge of spoken and written English. Emphasizes intensive general academic vocabulary development, extensive reading and listening comprehension, major aspects of sentence structure and grammar, and speaking and writing improvement using linguistically controlled materials. Two hours of laboratory/tutorial practice required per week. Course Outline: ESL 130  

    Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
  
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    ESL* E135 - Grammar III (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ESL* E020  with a grade of “C” or higher, or placement at ESL* E130  
     
    An intensive language course for non-native students who want to develop competency in the use of intermediate grammatical structures in practical and academic contexts. The course provides students the opportunity to learn these structures through daily reading and language analysis exercises, speaking and writing practice. Course Outline: ESL 135  

    Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
  
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    ESL* E140 - Combined Skills IV (6 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ESL placement test or ESL* E130  
     
    Helps intermediate level ESL students improve their reading and writing skills and provides practice in listening and speaking. Reading assignments stress comprehension and vocabulary building. Writing skills focus on developing basic sentence structure and simple paragraphs. Students listen to taped lectures, practice dictation and note-taking, and participate in structured group discussions. All activities focus on expanding knowledge of English and developing fluency in all skills. Two hours of laboratory/tutorial practice required per week. Course Outline: ESL 140  

    Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
  
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    ESL* E147 - Oral Communications IV (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ESL* E130  or permission of the instructor
     
    A speech improvement course to help intermediate-level non-native speakers of English to communicate more effectively in everyday situations and in academic settings. Focus is on developing greater clarity and fluency in spoken English through daily listening discrimination and pronunciation exercises; peer observation and interaction; guided group discussions and individual oral presentations. One hour of laboratory or tutorial practice required per week. Course Outline: ESL 147  

    Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
  
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    ESL* E150 - Combined Skills V (6 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ESL placement test or ESL* E140  
     
    An advanced language course for non-native students who have developed basic fluency in written and spoken English and who wish to further improve their language skills for academic or career purposes. Emphasizes intensive academic vocabulary development, extensive reading practice using short and long selections of general interest from academic subjects and literary works, individual pronunciation and oral presentations. Elements of effective writing, including problems in advanced syntax and sentence structure, are applied in short essays and longer writings such as autobiographies and book reports. Two hours of laboratory/tutorial practice required per week. Course Outline: ESL 150  

    Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
  
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    ESL* E155 - Grammar V (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of ESL* E140  with a grade of “C” or higher, or placement at ESL* E150  
     
    An intensive language course for non-native students who want to develop competency in the use of advanced grammatical structures in academic contexts. The course provides students the opportunity to master these structures through daily reading and language analysis exercises, group discussion and essay writing. Course Outline: ESL 155  

    Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
  
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    ESL* E160 - Combined Skills VI (6 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ESL placement test or ESL* E150  
     
    Helps advanced ESL students expand and refine their reading, listening, speaking and writing skills for more effective communications in college and career settings. Students read non-fiction and fiction relating to North American culture and other subjects, discuss readings in small groups, then respond to readings by writing essays, summaries and reports. Students listen to taped lectures, dialogues and narratives from radio and television, and present oral reports and debates on selected topics. Activities focus on developing fluency, clarity and correctness of expression. Course Outline: ESL 160  

    Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. Up to 12 ESL credits may be used to fulfill foreign language/humanities or open elective graduation requirements.
  
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    ESL* E167 - Oral Communications VI (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): ESL* E150  or permission of the instructor
     
    A speech improvement course to help advanced-level non-native speakers of English communicate more effectively in academic and professional settings. Focus is on accent reduction and developing communication strategies through listening discrimination and pronunciation exercises; self-analysis practice, peer observation and interaction, and oral presentations. One hour laboratory/tutorial practice required per week. Course Outline: ESL 167  

    Intermediate and Advanced ESL courses carry foreign language credit. A maximum of 12 credits of ESL courses may be applied as open-elective credits in the General Studies degree program.

First Year Studies (FS)

  
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    FS E100 - Freshman Seminar (3 credits)


    Parallel(s): All students placing into ENG* E092  and/or ENG* E094  must take FS 100 concurrently.
     
    Freshman Seminar introduces students to diverse academic content, emphasizing the acquisition and application of learning strategies in preparation for rigorous college study. The content is designed to prepare students to develop their own individual, academic and career success through self-evaluation, inquiry, application of specific strategies, discussions, and classroom exercises and assignments. These activities help students acquire and apply specific study strategies, stimulate critical thinking skills, practice oral and written expression, establish goals, practice effective self and time management, become contributing members of the HCC community, encourage meaningful relationships with professors and classmates, and choose behaviors leading to a successful academic experience. This course should be taken within the first 12 credit hours. Course Outline: FS 100  

    This course is required for students in the General Studies program.

Foreign Languages (ARA, FRE, ITA, LAT, SPA)

  
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    ARA* E101 - Elementary Arabic I (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM, SOPX
     
    This course is intended to bring students with no prior experience in the Arabic language to a proficiency level of Novice Mid (as per American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages or ACTFL guidelines) in Speaking, Listening, Reading and Writing, with a focus on effective spoken communication. Elements of Culture and Civilization will also be studied. To this end, written Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and colloquial spoken forms will receive equal emphasis in coursework. No prerequisites. Course Outline: ARA 101  

  
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    ARA* E102 - Elementary Arabic II (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): ARA* E101  or Permission of the instructor.
     
    Arabic 102 is the second semester in the two-year basic language sequence and it builds on the basic language skills learned in ARA* E101 . It is communicative in approach, emphasizing oral communication as a foundation for building balanced proficiency in the four communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Topics include basic structures, vocabulary, pronunciation, and writing, as well as further elements of culture and civilization. Course Outline: ARA 102  

  
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    FRE* E101 - Elementary French I (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): A foreign language placement test is required or permission of instructor. Native Speakers are not permitted to take this course for credit.
     
    French 101 is a course designed for students without previous knowledge of the language. In this course, the four language skills will be developed: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course will also introduce students to French speaking countries and cultures around the world. Course Outline: FRE 101  

  
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    FRE* E102 - Elementary French II (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): Either a foreign language placement test, FRE* E101 , or permission of instructor is required. Students who place outside of the designated range for this class will not be permitted to take this course for credit.
     
    A continuation of FRE* E101 , this course is for students who have taken either FRE* E101  or one year of high school French. This course continues to cover the basic grammar patterns of the French language and builds competence in all fours skill areas: reading, writing, listening, and speaking at a basic level (personal information, immediate needs, survival skills, repeated utterances). The student will gain exposure to a broad range of vocabulary, grammar patterns, and major tenses. Through varied class activities such as group work, skits, role-play situations, oral presentations, oral proficiency and communication shall be emphasized. Course Outline: FRE 102  

    Laboratory time is required weekly.
  
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    FRE* E201 - Intermediate French I (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): FRE* E102 , Placement test or permission of the instructor.
     
    Continued systematic review of the French language and culture. Continuation of the gradual and proportional development of the four basic skills: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis will be placed on Reading and Writing. Detailed explanation of the principles of grammar. Training in reading comprehension to facilitate the development of writing skills. Prose and poetry from contemporary literature will be introduced to enhance writing abilities. Access to the Internet will be encouraged. Course Outline: FRE 201  

    Laboratory time is required weekly.
  
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    FRE* E202 - Intermediate French II (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): FRE* E201 , Placement test or permission of the instructor.
     
    This course is a continuation of French 201 where we will continue to develop the four skills to master vocabulary and grammatical structures using texts and short novels from the francophone world, discussing contemporary topics, writing short essays to gain proficient level in French. Course Outline: FRE 202  

    Laboratory time is required weekly.
  
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    FRE* E299 - Independent Study in French (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Foreign Language faculty
     
    Designed for those students who wish to obtain credit in a selected topic in French. Students should have a high academic standing in French language.

    All independent projects must be arranged in the semester prior to registration, with advance departmental approval and with the supervision of a full-time faculty member. For more information, see Independent Study Courses .
  
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    ITA* E101 - Elementary Italian I (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM, SOPX
     
    Stresses pronunciation, aural comprehension and conversation as well as the principles of grammar in order to reach facility in reading, writing, and speaking the language. Laboratory time is required weekly. Course Outline: ITA 101  

  
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    ITA* E102 - Elementary Italian II (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): ITA* E101  or permission of the instructor
     
    A continuation of ITA* E101 , this course is for students who previously took Italian 101 or the equivalent. Native speakers and students who have had more than the equivalent of one semester of Italian should opt to take something else. In this class, basic grammatical patterns and vocabulary are studied. Focus is on all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Course Outline: ITA 102  

  
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    ITA* E299 - Independent Study in Italian (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Foreign Language faculty
     
    Designed for those students who wish to obtain credit in a selected topic in Italian. Students should have a high academic standing in Italian language.

    All independent projects must be arranged in the semester prior to registration, with advance departmental approval and with the supervision of a full-time faculty member. For more information, see Independent Study Courses .
  
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    LAT* E101 - Elementary Latin I (Distance Learning) (3 credits)


    Code(s): HISX, HUM
     
    The first of a series of four courses designed to develop the ability to speak, read, and write Classical Latin. The course includes an introduction to the history of the Latin language and Roman history, pronunciation, the first three noun declensions, the demonstrative pronouns hic, ille, and iste, the four verb conjugations in the present, future and imperfect tenses, the irregular verbs sum and possum in addition to word order, agreement of adjectives, apposition, and various sentence structures, writing short essays on various aspects of Roman culture and history. Course Outline: LAT 101  

    This is distance learning course requiring a computer and internet connection.
  
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    LAT* E102 - Elementary Latin II (Distance Learning) (3 credits)


    Code(s): HISX, HUM
    Prerequisite(s): LAT* E101  
     
    The second of a series of four courses designed to develop the ability to speak, read, and write Classical Latin. The course includes a quick review of Latin 101 and the study of the personal, demonstrative, reflexive, intensive, possessive, relative, and interrogative pronouns; the perfect active system of all verbs; the passive voice; the i-stem and fourth declension nouns; numerals, various ablatives and genitive and writing short essay and Web presentations on Roman history, politics, and culture. Course Outline: LAT 102  

    This is distance learning course requiring a computer and internet connection.
  
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    SPA* E101 - Elementary Spanish I (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): A foreign language placement test is required or permission of the instructor. Native speakers are not permitted to register for this course. Students who place outside the range designated for this class will not be permitted to take this course for credit.
     
    An introduction to Spanish language and Spanish-speaking cultures with emphasis on the development of the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in order to prepare students for successful entry into target language. Laboratory is required. Course Outline: SPA 101  

  
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    SPA* E102 - Elementary Spanish II (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): SPA* E101 , a foreign language placement test, or permission of the instructor. Students who place outside the range designated for this class will not be permitted to take this course for credit.
     
    A continuation of SPA* E101 . This course builds upon previous introduction to the Spanish language and Spanish-speaking cultures with a continued emphasis on the development of the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Laboratory is required. Course Outline: SPA 102  

  
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    SPA* E109 - Spanish for Medical Personnel (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): SPA* E101 , a foreign language placement test, or permission of instructor. Students who place outside the range designated for this class will not be permitted to take this course for credit.
    Parallel(s): SPA* E102  
     
    A course containing the same language skills as SPA* E102  with an emphasis on vocabulary and content related to the medical field. It provides medical personnel with the basic Spanish skills to deal with Spanish speaking patients in the health care delivery system. It also describes the diverse Spanish cultures and explains their role in health idioms and phraseology. Course Outline: SPA 109  

  
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    SPA* E201 - Intermediate Spanish I (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): SPA* E102 , a foreign language placement test, or permission of instructor. Students who place outside the range designated for this class will not be permitted to take this course for credit.
     
    Conducted in Spanish, this course is for students who have already attained a working knowledge of the language. Students continue to develop and strengthen oral (speaking and listening) and literacy (reading and writing) skills, as well as learn more about Spanish-speaking cultures. Students are introduced to cultural and literary materials that will develop an appreciation of the arts, history, culture, and the literature of Spanish-speaking peoples and create an awareness of cultural, social, and linguistic differences and similarities. Instruction focuses on oral and written communication. Course Outline: SPA 201  

    Laboratory time is required weekly.
  
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    SPA* E202 - Intermediate Spanish II (3 credits)


    Code(s): AESX, HUM, SOPX
    Prerequisite(s): SPA* E201 , a foreign language placement test, or permission of the instructor. Students who place outside the range designated for this class will not be permitted to take this course for credit.
     
    A continuation of SPA* E201 Course Outline: SPA 202   

    Laboratory time is required weekly.
  
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    SPA* E251 - Advanced Spanish I (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): SPA* E202 , a foreign language placement test, or permission of the instructor. Students who place outside the range designated for this class will not be permitted to take this course for credit.
     
    Intensive vocabulary building and study of idiomatic usage. Practice in oral reports based on topics of general interest. Advanced problems in syntax and weekly themes written in Spanish. Course Outline: SPA 251  

    Laboratory time is required weekly.
  
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    SPA* E252 - Advanced Spanish II (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): SPA* E251 , a foreign language placement test, or permission of the instructor. Students who place outside the range designated for this class will not be permitted to take this course for credit.
     
    A continuation of SPA* E251 . Weekly themes and laboratory time required. Course Outline: SPA 252   

  
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    SPA* E299 - Independent Study in Spanish (3 credits)


    Code(s): HUM
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Foreign Language faculty
     
    Designed for those students who wish to obtain credit in a selected topic in Spanish. Students should have a high academic standing in Spanish language. Also taught in Spanish.

    All independent projects must be arranged in the semester prior to registration, with advance departmental approval and with the supervision of a full-time faculty member.

    For more information, see Independent Study Courses . 


Geography (GEO)

  
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    GEO* E111 - World Regional Geography (3 credits)


    Code(s): SSCI
    Prerequisite(s) or Parallel(s): ENG* E101  
     
    A study of the physical and human elements of global geography. Regional, cultural and population influences will be explored to give the student a better understanding of different geographical situations found in the world. The differences and inter-relationships of the developed and developing nations are probed in the depth necessary to understand present societies. Group discussions and audio-visual presentations are used as methods to give the student better insight into the influence of geography. Course Outline: GEO 111  


Health (HLT)

  
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    HLT* E103 - Investigations in Allied Health (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s) or Parallel(s): ENG* E101  
     
    This course is designed to assist traditional and non-traditional first-year college students to meet the expectations of a curriculum and a career in health-related fields. The student will become familiar with the rigors of higher education and the specific skills needed to maximize the student’s opportunity for academic and clinical success. The course will include a comprehensive overview of the duties and responsibilities associated with clinical competency. Interdisciplinary learning strategies, correlating clinical and didactic education, life management skills, work ethics, and critical thinking skills necessary for all health providers will be emphasized. Course Outline: HLT 103  


History (HIS)

  
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    HIS* E101 - Western Civilization I (3 credits)


    Code(s): HISX, SSCI
    Prerequisite(s) or Parallel(s): ENG* E101  
     
    This course covers the development of Western Civilization from the ancient world through the middle ages to early modern times. Particular emphasis is placed upon the classical legacy, feudalism, the growth of monarchical power, the Renaissance, the Age of Exploration, and the Reformation. Course Outline: HIS 101  

  
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    HIS* E102 - Western Civilization II (3 credits)


    Code(s): HISX, SSCI
    Prerequisite(s) or Parallel(s): ENG* E101  
     
    This course examines major developments in Western Civilization from the advent of the modern world to the present. Particular emphasis is placed upon the post-Reformation emergence of the nation-state, Louis XIV, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, modern imperialism, the growth of rivalry between the powers, and the development of new political philosophies which have helped to produce the existing international situation. Course Outline: HIS 102  

  
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    HIS* E121 - World Civilization I (3 credits)


    Code(s): HISX, SSCI
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E101  
     
    The development of World civilizations from the ancient world through the 17th century.  Particular emphasis is placed upon world history in global perspective, the development of agriculture, and major trends in the political, military and cultural histories of world civilizations.

    Course Outline: HIS 121  

  
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    HIS* E122 - World Civilization II (3 credits)


    Code(s): HISX, SSCI
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E101  
     
    The development of World civilizations since the 17th century.  Particular emphasis is placed upon world history in global perspective and major trends in the political, military, technological, and cultural histories of world civilizations. 

    Course Outline: HIS 122  

  
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    HIS* E201 - U.S. History I (3 credits)


    Code(s): HISX, SSCI
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E101  
     
    This course covers the political, economic and social development of the United States to 1877, from the earliest Native American habitation of the United States to the Civil War. Topics covered include Native American societies and Columbian contact, the role of economics and religion in colonial America, the institution of slavery, the struggle for independence, formation of a national government, Jacksonian Democracy, westward expansion, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Course Outline: HIS 201  

  
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    HIS* E202 - U.S. History II (3 credits)


    Code(s): HISX, SSCI
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E101  
     
    This course deals with U.S. History from the end of the Civil War to relatively modern times. Topics to be covered include reconstruction, the West and Native American resistance to European rule, immigration, urbanization and industrialization, populism and progressivism, the emergence of the United States as a world power, Woodrow Wilson, World War I and Versailles, the Twenties, the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War. Course Outline: HIS 202  

  
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    HIS* E211 - History of Connecticut (3 credits)


    Code(s): SSCI
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E101  
     
    A survey of the history of Connecticut from pre-Colonial times to the present. The course will emphasize Connecticut’s rich multicultural history. Topics will include Native American, European, African-American, and Caribbean influences, immigration, and industrialization and deindustrialization. Course Outline: HIS 211  

  
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    HIS* E298 - Special Topics in History (3 credits)


    Code(s): SSCI
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E101  
     
    A faculty-developed seminar course dealing with a specific period, region, theme and/or interpretive thread in history which will be approved by the instructor and chairperson. Course Outline: HIS 298  

  
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    HIS* E299 - Independent Study in History (1-3 credits)


    Code(s): SSCI
    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E101  and Permission of the Instructor
     
    Individual study of a special area, topic, theme or problem in History by agreement with the instructor. Course Outline: HIS 299  

    All independent projects must be arranged in the semester prior to registration, with advance departmental approval and with the supervision of a full-time faculty member. For more information, see Independent Study Courses .

Honors (HN)

  
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    HN E200 - Honors Seminar (Fall only) (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E102  and permission of the Honors Advisor; recommended: courses in literature, philosophy, psychology or sociology, history, and laboratory science
     
    An interdisciplinary course that examines a topic from the differing perspectives of the major academic disciplines - humanities, natural and physical sciences, and social sciences. The instructors and topic/ content vary from year to year. Offered in the Fall semester only.

    Open only to students registered in the Honors Program. Satisfies an open elective requirement.
  
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    HN E225 - Independent Honors Project (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): HN E200 , permission of the Honors Advisor, and approved Honors contract
     
    An original student project completed under the guidance of a faculty mentor that demonstrates a student’s ability to apply knowledge and skills in a creative and scholarly manner. The student must receive approval in the semester preceding the term during which the project is done.

    Open only to students registered in the Honors Program. Satisfies an open elective requirement.

Human Services (HSE)

  
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    HSE* E101 - Introduction to Human Services (3 credits)


     
    An interdisciplinary orientation to major Human Service agencies and institutions in this region including education, law enforcement, child care, mental health, recreation, geriatrics, etc. Participants will study the roles and functions of professionals in these types of Human Services careers. Instruction will include team-teaching, guest speakers, and field visitations. Course Outline: HSE 101  

  
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    HSE* E114 - Advocacy in Human Services (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E101  
     
    A comprehensive survey of effective advocacy for and with human service agencies. Students will learn about power bases and influence in human service systems. The course will introduce students to advocacy theory and practice, providing lectures, practical hands-on assignments, and participatory learning. Course Outline: HSE 114  

  
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    HSE* E121 - Strategies for Developing Capable Children and Youth (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s) or Parallel(s): ENG* E101  
     
    An overview of specific skills and practical strategies for developing responsible, capable children and youth and for strengthening families. Practical techniques are explained and applied in dealing with and preventing problems in families. Teaching methods include interactive group experiences and discussion, exercises, reading, and practice assignments. Skills acquired are applicable to broader settings, including childcare programs and schools. Course Outline: HSE 121  

  
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    HSE* E134 - Introduction to Mental Health (3 credits)


     
    A study of mental illnesses and addictions as it relates to children, youth and adults with severe mental illness. Topics include treatment, rehabilitation and recovery, managed care, community support services, public awareness, consumer empowerment, and career opportunities. Course Outline: HSE 134  

  
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    HSE* E141 - Addiction and Mental Illness in Behavioral Health Care (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): ENG* E101  or permission of the instructor
     
    An overview of the policy and treatment issues in behavioral healthcare. Particular areas of concern include assessments, treatment concepts, national and state policies, dual diagnosis issues, managed care, and client motivation. The course examines current research and demographics which underpin the behavioral health movement. Course Outline: HSE 141  

  
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    HSE* E147 - Change Theory and Strategies in Behavioral Health Care (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): PSY* E111  and ENG* E101  or permission of the instructor
     
    An overview of the theories of human behavior, addiction, mental health and change in all of these areas of practice. Emphasis on the stages of change and Motivational Interviewing as used in the Behavioral Healthcare Model. The course will also examine the application of these concepts, theories and skills to individuals with multiple behavioral difficulties. Course Outline: HSE 147  

  
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    HSE* E161 - Disabilities Across the Lifespan (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): PSY* E111  
     
    An overview of the field of developmental disabilities as it applies to people across the lifespan from birth to old age. Topics include mental retardation, cognitive disabilities, acquired brain injury, physical disabilities, sensory impairment and others. The course examines these topics from a variety of perspectives including prevalence, psychological aspects, age-related, adaptive problems and habilitative services in the continuum of care. Course Outline: HSE 161  

  
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    HSE* E198 - Special Problems in the Human Services (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Human Services faculty
     
    A research project-oriented course under the personal supervision of a faculty member in the Human Services Program. It is designed to provide an opportunity to explore particular problem and subject areas within the area of Human Services. Subjects may be in urban studies, law enforcement, mental health, early childhood education, public administration, gerontology, etc. Assignments and hours will be individually tailored with the student. Course Outline: HSE 198  

  
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    HSE* E202 - Introduction to Counseling/Interviewing (3 credits)


     
    A developmentally-based, experiential course designed to introduce pre-professionals and professionals to the basic concepts, theories and skills used in human service counseling. Practical application of skills and role-playing will be emphasized. Course Outline: HSE 202  

  
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    HSE* E206 - Correctional Counseling (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s) or Parallel(s): PSY* E111  
     
    A study of casework, counseling, philosophy and methods, and treatment techniques used in correctional settings. Course Outline: HSE 206  

  
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    HSE* E209 - Applied Counseling Skills (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): HSE* E202  
     
    Provides students the opportunity to develop skills necessary for facilitating counseling relationships. Students observe, interact with, participate in and critique a variety of role playing exercises/simulations, and live counseling sessions as a means of mastering counseling skills. 

    Course Outline: HSE 209  

  
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    HSE* E210 - Group and Interpersonal Relations (3 credits)


     
    A cross-disciplinary seminar introducing participants to the development and dynamics of small-group relationships and communications. Emphasis on theories and specific techniques designed to lead to self and interpersonal understanding among group members, research regarding the nature of behavioral understanding among group members, research regarding the nature of behavioral change, and supervised experience in participatory groups. Seminar will include a variety of techniques, including lecture, observation, role-playing, simulation, and video-tape analysis. Course Outline: HSE 210  

  
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    HSE* E222 - Emotional Disorders in Children and Youth (3 credits)


    Prerequisite(s): PSY* E111  
     
    An examination of current treatment methods for children and youth with emotional disorders. Particular areas of focus include assessment and diagnosis, treatment approaches, intervention skills, effective service delivery models and systems issues from birth to three, preschool, latency, and adolescence. Course Outline: HSE 222  

 

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